The Next Big Things: Why AI Changes Everything?


Merc R&D chief Ola Källenius on why artificial intelligence doesn’t mean the robots taking over

> IN MY job, you tend to be a technology optimist by definition. On the cusp of this knowledge society, supported by AI, job profiles will change and companies and individuals alike will have to adapt.

> IF WE keep that mindset, I believe there will be an explosion of new areas to be explored within the realms of technological possibility.

Does It Work? Ferrari Drift Control

Ferrari’s Dynamic Enhancer

FERRARI’S LATEST handling tool is about intentional and unintentional loss of traction – supporting plenty of the former, to make your driving way more fun, without letting it progress into the latter. Or, in layman’s terms, a crash.

Ferrari has used extremely clever traction control systems for years, with Side Slip Control having found a home in some of Maranello’s most extreme cars since the 458 Speciale, followed by sideways superstars including the 488 GTB, F12 tdf and now the 488 Pista.

The next big things  Formula 1-inspired car makers

Business secretary Greg Clark on the need for Britain’s car industry to put the D back into R&D

> ANTICIPATING THE future is fraught with difficulties. Faced with all of the technological possibilities, you need to prepare for it, to make sure you make the right decisions now in order to succeed in the years ahead. That’s why the automotive sector features prominently in the industrial strategy we launched just before Christmas.

> WE’RE PROUD of the achievements of the sector. It’s a sector that employs over 400,000 men and women in this country, providing not only good jobs

VW Reveals Its EV Hardware

Countdown to the big plug-in: just one year to go

With its all-electric ID range set to be revealed before the end of 2019, VW reveals the hardware that will underpin 10 million cars. By Ian Adcock

THE ELECTRIC ID brand is as significant to VW as the Beetle was in 1945 and the original Golf in 1974. In their different ways, they transformed the company. Can ID do the same at a time when VW is still being buffeted by the aftershocks of Dieselgate?

Meet the perfect engine

Valve control is fundamentally compromised on conventional engines. But that’s all changing with the arrival of infinitely variable valves. By Ian Adcock

IMAGINE A VALVE control system without compromises, one that isn’t crank-driven and doesn’t play by conventional rules. Such an engine would allow infinitely variable timing on all its valves, independent of one another, meaning it could effectively tune itself on the move, boosting power and efficiency. It could also offer cylinder deactivation, eliminate a turbocharger’s wastegate, switch between four- and two-stroke cycles and even run as an ingenious, very efficient 12-stroke.

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